SEPT 10 | 8PM

ADRON | SPECIAL GUEST

VENUE CHANGE
The Oak Room at The Serenbe Inn
10950 Hutchesons Ferry Road
Chattahoochee Hills

ELIOT BRONSON

Award-winning singer/songwriter Eliot Bronson’s latest self-titled album was tracked entirely analog in Nashville by acclaimed producer Dave Cobb (Sturgill Simpson, Rival Sons, Jason Isbell, Nikki Lane). It’s a vibey, ten-song album with an uncluttered production aesthetic that highlights Bronson’s songwriting and his achingly beautiful vocals.
 
The story goes that after Bronson completed writing this cycle of songs, he sent Dave Cobb an unsolicited email with a sample track attached. Bronson was inspired to reach out to Cobb because he was intrigued by the spacious vocal production on the Jason Isbell record which Cobb had produced. Bronson felt Cobb could help him realize the atmospheric and timeless qualities he wanted for his songs. Cobb was impressed with Bronson’s music and replied back. “I was stunned when I got a response. It was really validating for me because I sort of had him on a pedestal,” Bronson says candidly.

The record is something of a homecoming for Bronson, who was raised in a Pentecostal home by a family for which music was prayer and life was expressed and enjoyed in song.  At an early age, Bronson discovered his parents’ folk collection of 1960s artists. These two became formative musical influences shaping Bronson’s purposeful, pensive, and poetic songwriting. Though his own music adventures took him away from these roots, he returns home to these music guideposts with Eliot Bronson

“I spent a long time trying to get away from where I came from,” Bronson says, “but it never really felt right. This is the music I’ve always had in me. This record is me.”

Eliot Bronson is anchored by Bronson’s honeyed weary voice; blend of wry wit with emotional sincerity; expansive palette of Americana; and the album’s crisp vintage production. “River Runs Dry” boasts high-lonesome vocal harmonies, tenderly mournful lap steel, and it conjures up a cathartic sadness. “I like songs to preserve little moments without telling a specific story, so you feel something but you don’t always know exactly why,” Bronson reveals. The rollicking “Comin’ For Ya North Georgia Blues” combines almost William Boroughs-esque cutup images with unbridled and euphoric shitkicking musicality. “I was really having fun with words and ideas on that one, trying to paint picture of a relationship” he explains.

Bronson’s engaging cleverness comes to the front on the “You Wouldn’t Want Me If You Had Me.” “I didn’t think I was being funny on that one,” he says with a good-natured laugh. “I was being truthful, but I guess it works on a humorous level too. My friend said that title is the ‘dating musician’s credo.’”

"Shaped by the Pentecostal music of his upbringing and the ’60s folk records in his parents collection, Eliot Bronson’s latest self-titled album is an Americana gem. Produced by Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson), Eliot Bronson is a poetic blend of urban coffee house and outskirts-of-town saloon. His deeply emotional lyrics about a wide range of topics have earned the former member of The Brilliant Inventions a host of songwriting awards for good reason."— Josh Jackson Paste Magazine

"One of the key up-and-coming songwriters in the Americana scene." -   Brice Ezell Pop Matters

"It’s always exciting to discover an artist of this caliber, and given the fact Bronson’s just now coming into his own, even more accolades seem destined to follow. Eliot Bronson not only reflects well on this gifted singer/songwriter, but it also bodes well for the fame that’s sure to follow." – Lee Zimmerman Elmore Magazine

ADRON

Adron is rapidly being recognized as one of the most uniquely gifted songwriters and vocalists of this generation. Named Best Songwriter of 2012 by the Atlanta-based arts and culture magazine Creative Loafing, she has managed to unite audiences from wildly far-flung backgrounds, age groups and subcultural scenes with her universally communicative and infectious music. In a style nearly impossible to describe using the terms of conventional genres, she playfully blends Brazilian samba, bossa nova and Tropicália with Classical harmony, the sincerity and thoughtfulness of singer-songwriters like Joni Mitchell and Harry Nilsson, and the full-bodied rhythms of 1970’s pop and r&b.

Adron’s music is infused with an international texture and a remarkably vintage, yet completely original and personal sound. While able to craft polished and mature songs, she also possesses a bold and often bizarre sense of humor that she manages to sneak into her lyrics. Adron also adds a unique array of embellishments such as birdcalls and other vocalizations, and sings eloquently in three languages. Though the music is effortlessly pleasing, it is Adron’s rare ability to meld genre, geography and musical epochs that reveal the true breadth of her talent.

In addition to an extensive performance schedule she is an avid artist and displays the same extraordinary deftness and creativity in her visual art that she does in her music. All of her past album artwork has been her own, including the delicately beaded sculpture, mask and disc art used for Organismo's album design.